Victoria Morris

Victoria Morris

In my last blog post, we looked at what the main financial statement documents are and what they mean. Now that you understand what each of the financial statements are for, this blog post looks more closely at some of the items you can expect to see on the financials, and how this information can help you assess your co-operative’s financial health. 

Financial statements can help board members and managers understand your co-operative’s spending, your financial position, as well as helping boards provide oversight on the spending and financial performance of the organization. This blog post is intended to help directors that aren’t financial experts gain some introductory understanding of the main financial statements co-operatives use and to gain a few ideas of what kinds of information to look for on these statements. 

There are lots of videos out there that can help people learn about co-operatives. In this blog post, we’ll look at four types of videos that can help explain what co-operatives are, how they are different from other forms of business, what the co-operative principles are and what they mean, as well as a history of a couple of co-ops.

So you want to learn about co-operatives. What are the options? Where to start?

From introductory level co-op basics, to Masters’ degree programs, read on to learn about some Canadian (and a few international) opportunities for co-operative focused learning opportunities. There are two main approaches to learning – academic and non-academic learning. This blog post will give you some ideas about both types of learning. There is also self-guided learning, and event or course-based learning. I’ll share some examples of all these types of learning opportunities. There are lots of options out there, this blog post will offer a few ideas in each category.

So you know that member engagement in a co-operative is an important and needed focus area. But what the heck should you actually do? This blog post provides a few ideas for members of co-operatives, and a few ideas for co-operatives of what actions both can take to increase member engagement.

Many co-operatives feel like they need to engage their members more. The challenge of how to engage members affects both new and mature co-operatives. Often, member engagement has been viewed as having many members participating in a co-operative’s annual general meeting. While AGM participation is one way to engage members, there are many, many other methods to ensuring that a co-operative and its members are communicating and connected, and that members’ and the co-op’s needs are being met.